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More Seeds in the Garden

September 2nd, 2009

I found this while I was cleaning out one of my garden beds the other day. What kind of seeds do you think they are?
Tulip_seed_head
They’re tulip seeds. I saved them and thought I might try to start them to see what happens. I’ve researched and found out that it will take them 3 years to bloom. That’s why it takes patience to garden!
Tulip_Seeds
I’m not sure what color they’ll turn out to be, I’m not even sure which tulip they came from. What a fun experiment to try to start tulips from seed.

Any interesting plants you’ve tried to grow from seed before?

9 Comments to “More Seeds in the Garden”
  1. Tree on September 2, 2009 at 8:27 am

    I’ve never seen tulip seeds, only ever bulbs. Good Luck and keep us posted!

    Reply to Tree's comment

  2. Frugal Trenches on September 2, 2009 at 8:58 am

    Oh I so enjoy living vicariously through you!!

    *so* glad you made it into the coop!

    Reply to Frugal Trenches's comment

  3. Amy W. on September 2, 2009 at 11:20 am

    Good luck with that!

    Reply to Amy W.'s comment

  4. AlizaEss on September 2, 2009 at 11:23 am

    Just collected a spiky jimson-weed (or sacred datura) seedball from a plant growing like a weed under a city tree here in Baltimore. They grow completely unnoticed around here, even though they are strange toxic plants that bloom at night! Google image of the seeds.
    .-= AlizaEss´s last blog ..Produce Stickers =-.

    Reply to AlizaEss's comment

  5. risa b on September 2, 2009 at 4:48 pm

    Figuring out seeds is way better than TV. We kept one kale plant over the winter into the late spring, because we had never seen what one of those will do. I’m not sure we expected it to grow into a massive bush five feet tall, covered with thousands of tiny yellow blossoms, then yield innumerable Lilliputian “bean” pods which, winnowed, produced almost a pint of kale seeds. NOW what do we do? ;)

    Love the photos, as always.
    .-= risa b´s last blog ..For a healthy, happy job =-.

    Reply to risa b's comment

    • Susy on September 2, 2009 at 5:03 pm

      I guess you’ll be eating lots of kale! You could do seed trades as well, I think wintersown also collects saved seeds for things other than tomatoes.

      Reply to Susy's comment

  6. Beegirl on September 2, 2009 at 10:16 pm

    Howdy neighbor! Great to hear from you and thanks for your wonderful comment. Would you be willing to share your local find for grains/oats? I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!!! : ))

    Best of luck on the tulips! I’ve never grown them – I thought they were a bulb?
    .-= Beegirl´s last blog ..Life and Tomatoes =-.

    Reply to Beegirl's comment

  7. Dan on September 2, 2009 at 10:42 pm

    I think when you start tulips from seed you will get a mix of different colors but I am not total sure. If you end up with a black one the bulb will be worth a million dollars. I think it would be a fun experiment to grow them on, 3 years passes in no time it seems.
    .-= Dan´s last blog ..Monday’s Harvest Post =-.

    Reply to Dan's comment

    • Susy on September 2, 2009 at 11:36 pm

      Perhaps, I do have really dark purple tulips and I LOVE them. I wonder if they’ll be hardier than the regular ones.

      Reply to Susy's comment

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This is a daily journal of my efforts to cultivate a more simple life, through local eating, gardening and so many other things. We used to live in a small suburban neighborhood Ohio but moved to 153 acres in Liberty, Maine in 2012.

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