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Blizzard Breakfast

January 21st, 2019

Earlier this week I made a batch of rough puff pastry. Originally, it was supposed to be for dinner that evening, but I didn’t finish it in time. I was hoping it would a good batch, but wasn’t sure since it was my first time making any kind of a puffy pastry. I’ve been wanting to make the recipe for egg galettes from the ‘Jerusalem’ cookbook a few years ago, since I had a batch of pastry, I figured I’d give it a try.

It was well worth it, the pastry puffed nicely, the roasted red peppers and onions were perfect, and thankfully the chicken have been laying a few eggs once again to top it all off with more homeraised goodness. It’s a great recipe and would definitely be quick and easy if using store bought pastry. I was happy to have red peppers in the freezer, herbs from the basement garden, onions in the pantry, and eggs from the chickens to make it mostly produced on the farm.

What delicious goodness have you been trying/baking/eating lately?

Deviled Delights

May 15th, 2018

The chickens are laying like champs right now, which means we are flush with eggs. When you have chickens, there’s always that balance between having enough chickens to get the eggs you want in the winter and being overrun with eggs in the summer. I’d rather have a few too many than not enough, I barter with them, the dog LOVES them, and we eat a lot as well. Having a large cache of eggs, means I can take deviled eggs to events.

This past weekend, I made three different vareities: Smoked Salmon Stuffed Deviled eggs (from The Herbal Kitchen), Wasabi deviled eggs (adapted from a Martha Stewart Recipe, I soaked the eggs in soy sauce for a few hours before cutting/stuffing), and my own recipe made with eggs I pickled in homemade pickle brine.



They were all a hit, everyone had a favorite, mine were the pickled ones with the little violets on top. I’ll definitely be keeping these recipes in my rotation for years to come. As always, with fresh eggs, steaming is the only way to get them to peel beautifully, here’s my blog post on how to do that.

Are you a deviled egg fan? Do you have a favorite recipe?

Quote of the Day: Tamar Adler

September 17th, 2017

“Eggs should be laid by chickens that have as much say in it as any of us about our egg laying does. Their yolks should, depending on the time of year, range from buttercup yellow to marigold. They should come from as nearby as possible. WE don’t all live near cattle ranches, but most of us live surprisingly close to someone raising chickens for eggs. If you find lively eggs from local chickens, buy them. They will be a good deal more than edible.”

Tamar Adler in An Everlasting Meal


Before we had our own chickens, we purchased chicken from a local farm. Eggs from happy chickens are really much more flavorful than those from the factory farms.

We now have our own flock, which range quite happily on a fairly large plot behind a few hundred feet of electric net fencing (not technically “free” ranging, as the foxes nab them if they do, but close enough). There are between 15-30 of them laying between half to two dozen eggs a day, depending on the time of year and the age of the flock. Eggs are on the breakfast menu daily, usually with a side of some sort of vegetable from the garden or a piece of bread from the oven. Sometimes they’re made into omelets to use up small bits of leftover dinner that aren’t enough to make another entire meal in itself. Pot roast with vegetables makes a surprisingly good omelet, especially with some fresh parsley on top.

In the summer, when we are flush with eggs, I sell them to a few friends. These friends claim they are “the best eggs they’ve ever had” and some won’t even give my name out to their friends in fear that they won’t be able to get eggs if they do. My belief is that the eggs are good because the chickens are happy and enjoying very chickeny lives (the homemade fermented feed is also a big part of it as well). I’m happy that my little flock produces enough eggs for us and for a few friends. Good eggs are worth sourcing wherever you live.

Do you have your own egg layers or do you have a good source for good eggs?

The Incredible Egg

April 9th, 2015

Most mornings I have eggs for breakfast. I eat them poached, fried, scrambled, baked into frittatas, and pretty much any other way I can think to fix them. Now that all the ducks are laying I often eat an egg from each type of bird. Muscovy eggs are really big, more like goose eggs than ducks. You can see how big the yolk is on the top egg.
eggs
On the right you can see a chicken egg and on the bottom there’s an Ancona duck egg. They’re all delicious, but I will eat choose duck eggs over chicken eggs if you have them. I still haven’t eaten the turkey egg from Sunday, perhaps I’ll crack that open later this morning. I find that the different types of eggs can taste a little different and sometimes you can tell the difference between eggs from different birds.

Have you ever eaten duck/goose/turkey eggs?

Barter is Better

March 19th, 2015

My chickens are laying like champs, which is really surprising. My flock consists of: three six year old hens, three four year old hens, eight three year old hens, and four ten month old hens. Most days I’ve been getting between 12-17 eggs. My flock of anconas are just starting to lay as well. I have four ten month old hens and I’m getting 2-3 eggs from them each day.
eggs for barter
As a result of all this laying I’m overrun with eggs. Last week I sold/bartered five dozen, this week I did once again. Somehow I still have 7 dozen eggs in my pantry. We eat four-six for breakfast each day and Tara gets 2-3 daily as well. Pretty soon I’ll have to find a few more egg customers because these chickens just keep laying! The best thing is that most of my eggs are bartered. I trade them for raw milk and cedar lumber. Not a bad deal for either party!

Do you ever barter?

Reading & Watching
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About

This is a daily journal of my efforts to cultivate a more simple life, through local eating, gardening and so many other things. We used to live in a small suburban neighborhood Ohio but moved to 153 acres in Liberty, Maine in 2012.

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