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Munch, Munch, Munch

March 14th, 2018

The last two years have been great for acorns in our area of Maine, which translates to a large deer and turkey population. While deer are beautiful creatures, they’re also destructive to a garden. This winter has been particularly rough. Almost every shrub and tree in my gardens have been browsed heavily.

They hydrangeas were hit especially hard, I doubt there will be any blooms this coming summer. Now I have to take extra care to protect plants. Next fall you’ll find me wrapping things with burlap, adding fencing around the garden, and probably spraying some things with hot pepper oil to keep them safe from browsing deer.

Do you have issues with deer in your garden? What’s your preferred method of dealing with their winter browsing?

A Frosty Morn

October 19th, 2017

On Tuesday morning, we work up to our first frost of the season. It was 29 degrees in our garden, frost blanketed parts of the gardens and the lawn. All the tender vegetables and plants were hit, which is always a good thing in my mind.

At times, I have a difficult time clearing out plants that are still growing, blooming, and producing. Frost makes it easy to start clearing the garden, building compost piles, and getting on with putting the garden to bed for the winter.

Yesterday afternoon, I spent an hour or so clearing dahlias, tomatoes, peppers, nasturtiums, and all the other tender plants from the main garden. Today I’ll plant a cover crop in their stead, which should give it a bit of time to get established to cover the soil this winter. Luckily, there are still lost of crops in the garden that actually appreciate the cold weather. There is still broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, lettuce, spinach, and endive. We should be eating fresh vegetables from the garden for another month or two at least.

Frost used to be a bittersweet time in my mind, meaning the end of the gardening year, though now I’m learning to appreciate the part if plays in the cycle of the garden. I’m ready to hibernate for the winter, to a winter of sewing, crochet, and reading.

What’s happening in your garden weatherwise this week?

Quote of the Day: Rosemary Verey

July 14th, 2017

“We must all examine our environment, always gaining inspiration from existing natural features; we will then enhance rather than overwhelm our surroundings.”

Rosemary Verey in Making of a Garden.

I’ve been considering this idea as I walk around my garden. Truth be told, this idea is much more important when you live on a large property and have sweeping views or lots of woodland. Our property has a few acres of cleared land, a lovely view to the coastal mountain range, and acres of woods.


It can be hard to decide what to plant to tame the areas around the house but not distract from the natural surroundings. The nice this is that I have lovely backdrops for the various gardens here at Chiot’s Run. Mature woodland edges are always lovely behind a garden, especially when they’re far enough away to not suck all the moisture and nutrients from your plants.

What things in your environment do you need to consider when planning/adapting your garden?

How Does Your Edible Garden Grow?

June 6th, 2017

The edible garden is growing like mad. Strawberries are blooming, peas are growing taller, fennel bulbs are fattening up, lettuces are growing fuller and rounder…






The peppers however are not appreciating our cool, rainy spring so far. They’re doing OK, but will be happy when the weather finally warms up.

How’s your edible garden growing? Anything loving or hating your current weather?

So Close…

May 25th, 2017

I’m so close to getting all the seedlings planted. This past week I managed to get all the peppers and tomatoes in. They are filling out the side of the garden that was a cutting garden last summer. The soil hasn’t been improved as much as it has in the other half of the garden since this side has been left mostly fallow for the past few years.

I still have 5-6 flats of onions, leeks, and various flowers to get planted. Hopefully those will be planted today before a few days of rain. I always like to plant when we’re forecasted to have rain and a few cloudy days, I find it helps the plants deal with the shock of transplant better.

How’s your garden shaping up?

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About

This is a daily journal of my efforts to cultivate a more simple life, through local eating, gardening and so many other things. We used to live in a small suburban neighborhood Ohio but moved to 153 acres in Liberty, Maine in 2012.

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