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The Edible Garden

August 24th, 2020

This is my 8th summer gardening here in Maine, the edible garden is the best it’s ever been. That’s to be expected, all the additions of compost are really improving the soil structure, and the garden is almost expanded to the full size that we have been planning.

I still need to add fruit trees, berry bushes, grape vines, and a few other items, but overall it’s really starting to settle into place and look fantastic. It no longer looks like a new garden. It’s filled with tons of self seeded flower: anise hyssop, verbena bonariensis, echinacea, dill, coriander, and rose campion.

This year I added a tithonia hedge on both sides. Not only do these help with wind, they provide lots of food for pollinators, especially monarchs. Now that I have 120 feet of them, I notice the hummingbirds are loving them as well. It’s a constant buzz of activity and it is proving to be a great add for reducing the wind in the garden.

The vegetables are all producing well, some things I have cut down on this year, some I have increased. At this moment, the tomatoes are the stars of the show. Here in Maine, we have a short window to enjoy tomatoes fresh off the vine and we savor each and every one. The ‘Sungold’ tomatoes are especially stunning right now, I enjoy watching them ripen downward.

Overall, it’s been a great year for the edible garden. No doubt all of our years of improving the soil are finally paying off. We look forward to layering in more and more seasonal foods as we finalize the plans for this lovely space.

What are you harvesting and loving at the peak of ripeness right now?

Finally…..

September 10th, 2019

This year everything has been moving at a slower pace than normal, the cold weather has been the most likely culprit. Usually by now, the tithonias are huge and covered in blooms. This year they’re just starting to show their color.

It’s not a huge deal, at least they are blooming, which means they’re providing much needed late season food for monarchs and hummingbirds as they migrate. This year I planted 20 tithonias in a large hedge across one side of the main vegetable garden in the back. Since they aren’t as large as normal, at least there are more than normal.

How’s the season been in your garden? Early, late, wet, dry?

The Cutting Garden

August 19th, 2016

The cutting garden area in the main vegetable garden is a riot of color. Oddly enough, I’m not really one of those gardeners that likes all the colorful flowers spilling out of a border. My tastes tend to be more controlled and very monocromatic. I’m a fan of white, green and purpler in the garden with lots of green and only a few flowers. This area is quite lovely in its own respect, the pollinators are big fans.
The cutting garden 1
The cutting garden 2
The cutting garden 3
The cutting garden 4
The cutting garden 5
The cutting garden 6
The cutting garden 7
I only planted a few packets of seed, which is amazing when you stand back and look at the display. $10 can really get you a lot of color when it comes to a cutting garden!

What’s your favorite cut flower?

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About

This is a daily journal of my efforts to cultivate a more simple life, through local eating, gardening and so many other things. We used to live in a small suburban neighborhood Ohio but moved to 153 acres in Liberty, Maine in 2012.

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